Netflix

‘Love, Death + Robots’ is Netflix’s Newest NSFW Adults-Only Must Watch Series

Via Netflix

Maybe Netflix knows my viewing habits too well.

When I booted up the streaming service on Friday night, I was greeted with a new front-and-center tile advertising a show called Love, Death + Robots. I had never heard of this series before, which is kind of a rarity since my job typically involves staying on top of the latest pop culture happenings. I immediately assumed Netflix was recommending it to me based on my previous viewing habits. Then again, it was tagged as a Netflix Original, so it’s possible they were just giving premier placement to one of their own properties.

The short teaser rolls were enough to catch my interest, and a quick scan of the names involved in creating the series was enough to make me dive in. David Fincher (Fight Club, Seven, Gone Girl), Joshua Conen (House of Cards, Mindhunter) and Tim Miller (Deadpool) were all listed as executive producers for Love, Death +Robots, so you should immediately have a good idea what kind of content you’re about to watch.

Let’s start with the basics. The series is an 18-episode anthology series of animated shorts. The longest episode is 17 minutes long, while the shortest clocks in at just six minutes. None of the episodes connect to the others in any way, and at least a dozen different animation studios were tasked with bringing each story to life. In fact, only a couple studios worked on more than one episode each.

Via Netflix

The series starts with a serious shock to the senses. In “Sonnie’s Edge,” we get a weird tale about an underground fight club featuring huge monsters, controlled by a link directly into a human’s brain. We don’t want to spoil anything, but the episode immediately lives up to the R-Rating (TV-MA in Canada). Some of the things included in the episode: underground crime, a rape victim seeking redemption, viciously bloody gore, nudity, same-sex seduction, more gore, and enough F-bombs and hard C-words to satisfy any viewer who appreciates a strong cussing.

After the intensity of Episode 1, the series shifts immediately to a light-hearted and hilariously dark “Three Robots,” where a trio of advanced bots in the far future take a tour of a post-apocalyptic city — humans are long since extinct. The clever banter between the robots about the mysterious ancient humans — “Who knows? They had all sorts of orifices! Things were coming in, things were going out. It was crazy!” — is smart, addicting, and laugh out loud funny.

The series rolls on, with a trippy anime-styled story of a young sex-worker witnessing a murder, then futuristic farmers using mech suits to defend their crops, plus werewolves who enlist in the U.S. Military to fight in Afghanistan. “Helping Hand” is a terrifying and vomit-inducing story of a female astronaut facing an impossible decision of life or death. “Blindspot” features a gang of wise-cracking androids trying to steal precious cargo from a heavily defended convoy. And “Alternate Histories” shows six different versions of history, based on Hitler dying in various ways — our favorite was when the squids took over everything.

Via Netflix

The best part is that everyone I’ve talked to so far has a different favorite episode. I’m partial to “When The Yogurt Took Over” and “Secret Wars,” but others loved the lush underwater dream sequences in “Fish Night” or the steampunk version of Hong Kong in “Good Hunting.” Basically, there’s something for everyone here.

Love, Death + Robots should appeal to fans of the sci-fi, horror, and dark comedy genres of entertainment, as it expertly mixes all three. With multiple studios involved, every episode gets a fresh new look. Some of the ultra-realistic CGI in “Beyond the Aquila Rift” and “Lucky 13” even had me questioning whether the lead characters were even animated at all, because they looked so damn real. Maybe they were filmed in front of a green screen, and everything else was animated? Either way, the visuals were often stunning.

If you liked Black Mirror, then you can consider this series its condensed, animated cousin. Get ready for some very adult themes, very graphic visuals (you’ll get both male and female full frontal nudity at various points in the series), and some head-scratching endings that will keep you thinking long after you’ve turned off the TV.

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