Pro Wrestling

Mick Foley Explains The Problem With Vince McMahon

http://www.wwe24seven.com/wwe/mrmcmahon-wallpapers/ Source: wwe24seven.com

In a follow-up to his much-publicized Facebook posts in which WWE Hall of Famer and Hardcore Legend Mick Foley threatened to walk away from the WWE product for good over the creative direction of the company, Foley joined the Stone Cold Podcast on Monday to discuss his thoughts on the problems facing the organization.

Chief among those complaints was the man in charge, Vince McMahon, who many have recently accused of being far too controlling over the televised product, and being completely out out of touch with modern audiences. When speaking about Sasha Banks (although, frankly, this could be applied to any number of wrestlers on the roster), Foley had this to say:

“She’s living the dream, she’s got this character that works and I think she’s being messed with. If you have someone who is there, who is firing on all cylinders .. and I’m talking to Vince, leave her alone and let her do her thing. You’re 70, Vince. She’s 23. You don’t speak to everybody out there. Just because you don’t get it doesn’t mean it’s not there to be gotten. You have people chanting ‘We Want Sasha’ – it’s not without reason. Please, Mr. McMahon. Please leave her alone. Let her do her thing. If they want her, give her to them. Let her do her thing. You’re looking for faces, future faces of the company. Here’s one of them. It makes me sad to see someone work so hard, who is there and is being led in different directions.”

Vince once admitted (after much prodding from people who were more connected to the pulse of the audience) that the business might have passed him by fifteen years ago, and the resulting creative freedom given to wrestlers led, in part, to WWE’s renaissance and the rise of The Attitude Era. We’re not saying the same thing would happen today, but we just want to point out that Vince is now even farther out of the demographic he’s trying to attract to his product than he was back in 1997, and a new, younger perspective certainly couldn’t hurt.

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