Did You Watch “The Irishman” Closely Enough to Pass This Quiz?

ENTERTAINMENT

By: Bambi Turner

6 Min Quiz

Image: TriBeCa Productions / Sikelia Productions / Winkler Films / Netflix

About This Quiz

Even people who weren't born in the '70s have heard of Jimmy Hoffa. Once the head of a powerful union with ties to the mob, Hoffa disappeared in 1975 under very mysterious circumstances. Though he was declared dead in 1982, investigators have never been able to definitively determine where his remains ended up. Various tipsters have claimed he was buried everywhere from Giants Stadium to a shallow grave in a suburban backyard, but dozens of searches have failed to turn up any evidence. 

Hoffa's disappearance lies at the heart of 2019 Netflix release "The Irishman," but while this mystery certainly helps to draw viewers in, the film is much more than a simple whodunit. It pairs Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro in their ninth project together, a partnership which has produced such classics as "Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull" and "Goodfellas." If that's not enough, "The Irishman" gets extra mob-flick cred with the addition of Al Pacino, who honed his Mafia acting skills in such quintessential movies as "Scarface" and "The Godfather." The icing on the cake was "Goodfellas" and "Raging Bull" co-star Joe Pesci, who was so tempted by the promise of "The Irishman" that he came out of retirement to take on a major role. 

The incredible acting makes this three-hour-plus film seem to fly by, and yes, "The Irishman" does offer a possible solution to the Jimmy Hoffa mystery. Did you watch closely enough to ace this quiz on the characters and plotlines of this film, which is sure to become a classic? Prove it with this quiz!

If a fan of this movie asks someone if they paint houses, they want to know if ...

A 2004 book called "I Heard You Paint Houses" by Charles Brandt, which was inspired by the memoirs of Frank Sheeran, served as the basis for "The Irishman." In the film, "painting houses" is a euphemism for performing contract murders, or painting the walls with blood.

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After this man gets elected to the U.S. presidency in 1960, he tasks his brother with leading a "Get Hoffa" squad.

JFK's 1960 presidential campaign victory is shown in "The Irishman." In the movie, the newly elected president appoints his brother Robert to the position of U.S. attorney general with the instructions to bring Jimmy Hoffa down.

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Al Pacino plays one of the leading parts in "The Irishman." Do you know which one?

"Scarface" star Al Pacino takes on the role of union boss Jimmy Hoffa in the film. "The Irishman" presents Frank Sheeran's version of the details of Hoffa's 1975 disappearance, which has been hotly contested in the media.

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Which actor, known for playing a burglar in "Home Alone," starred as Russell Bufalino in the movie?

After creating movie magic with Martin Scorsese in "Raging Bull" and "Goodfellas," Joe Pesci retired from acting in 1999. Twenty years later, he came back to the set to star as mob boss Russell Bufalino in "The Irishman."

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Known for his brilliant work as Vito Corleone in "The Godfather Part II," which actor plays Frank Sheeran?

Legendary actor Robert De Niro not only starred as Frank Sheeran in "The Irishman," but also served as a producer on the film. De Niro won a best supporting actor Oscar in the '70s for his portrayal of the young Vito Corleone in "The Godfather: Part II."

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In the film, Jimmy Hoffa ends up in jail after he is convicted on which of these charges?

Come on, you didn't think Hoffa painted his own houses did you? Like many Mafia members, Hoffa ended up convicted of a seemingly small crime, at least compared to the role he almost assuredly played in murders and major financial crimes. It was jury tampering that landed him in jail in 1964, which is where he stayed until Nixon commuted his sentence in 1971.

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Can you remember what Frank Sheeran did for a living before he got linked up with the mob?

"The Irishman" is told from the perspective of Frank Sheeran, a truck driver who ended up working for the mob after his boss busted him selling stolen goods. The character is based on a real mob hitman with Irish roots who revealed many details about his crimes in his later years.

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The movie starts and ends in the same location. Do you know where?

"The Irishman" begins with a glimpse at Frank Sheeran in a nursing home. After the story is told in flashbacks of Frank's life, the movie ends with a final look at Frank all alone in his room at the facility.

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Mobster Tony Pro angers Jimmy Hoffa in the film when he wears something strange to a meeting. What was it?

If you ever end up in a meeting with a with a mob-connected union leader, you might want to stick to wearing pants. Anthony "Tony Pro" Provenzano makes this mistake in "The Irishman" when he appears at a meeting with Hoffa in shorts.

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It's common knowledge that Hoffa was head of a union, but can you name the group he ruled?

As of 2020, Jimmy Hoffa is still president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a union of truckers and blue-collar workers. Of course, it's not that Jimmy Hoffa. It's actually his only son, James, who first held the position in 1998.

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Where does Frank perform the hit on Crazy Joe Gallo of the Profaci crime family?

Joe Gallo, who picked up the nickname Crazy Joe after he was diagnosed with schizophrenia, was celebrating his birthday with his family at Umberto's Clam House in NYC when he was murdered by the mob. The 1972 hit took place pretty much as shown in "The Irishman," though it's not clear whether Frank Sheeran was actually the triggerman.

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Who does Frank beat up in front of his horrified young daughter out on Allegheny Avenue in Philly?

After Frank learns that the local grocer has treated his daughter disrespectfully, he rushes down to the store and viciously beats the man. The scene represents one of the first times viewers get to see Peggy witness her father's violent nature.

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Jimmy Hoffa doesn't have many bad habits, other than that whole Mafia thing. What's his one real vice?

While Hoffa gave his enemies plenty to criticize, from mob ties to crooked deals, he lived a surprisingly clean life. He rarely indulged in alcohol or other substances, but he's shown several times in "The Irishman" enjoying an ice cream sundae.

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Do you remember the name of Frank's daughter in the film?

Viewers get to watch Frank's daughter Peggy grow from an innocent young girl to a woman hardened by her father's crimes. Though she barely has any lines, Peggy's facial expressions add depth and emotion to the movie.

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One scene in "The Irishman" shows Joe Gallo assassinating Gambino boss Albert Anastasia. Where did the hit take place?

Albert Anastasia was a powerful boss in the Gambino family and head of a contract killer service called Murder, Inc. when he was gunned down at an NYC barbershop by Joe Gallo. A photo of the real 1957 Anastasia murder scene briefly appears on the screen in "The Irishman."

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Alright ... according to "The Irishman," how did Jimmy Hoffa die?

In "The Irishman," viewers see Frank Sheeran shoot Jimmy Hoffa twice at close range. This scene is based on the real Sheeran's own account of the murder ... problem is, there's really no way to verify whether it's true.

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Remember what the priest tells Frank as the film draws to a close?

Like many of the characters in "The Irishman," Frank is Roman Catholic, so it makes sense that he reaches out to a priest when he senses the end is near. The priest absolves him of his many horrible crimes, leaving him to die with a clear mind.

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Can you recall what Frank was stealing from work and selling to men with mob links at the start of the film?

When "The Irishman" begins, Frank is shown stealing meat from his delivery truck and selling it for cash to Felix DeTullio. It isn't until his company accuses him of theft and he is put on trial that he ends up linking up with the Mafia.

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How did Salvatore "Sally Bugs" Briguglio get his unusual nickname?

Actor Louis Cancelmi appears in the movie as mobster Sally Bugs, who got his nickname thanked to his giant eyeglasses. While he is eventually killed by Frank Sheeran, Sally Bugs is also in the car as Jimmy Hoffa is being driven to his doom.

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Some of Hoffa's last words in the film revolve around how to transport a certain type of critter. Which one?

In a tense scene leading up to Hoffa's murder, he warns his son to never put a fish in a car because the smell is impossible to get rid of. It's a moment that's weird and wonderful and somehow just right.

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Frank knows his friend Jimmy Hoffa is marked for murder. How does Russel keep Frank from warning Hoffa?

Russell Bufalino and Frank are heading to a wedding in 1975 when Russell tells him that Hoffa needs to die. To keep Frank from warning Hoffa to take cover, Russell informs Frank that he will be responsible for handling the hit.

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One of the youngest Oscar winners ever, which actress plays Frank Sheeran's daughter in the film?

Anna Paquin was just 11 when she won an Oscar for best supporting actress in "The Notebook." More than two decades later, her acting ability was put to the test when she played Frank's daughter in "The Irishman." With virtually no spoken dialogue, she managed to convey a huge amount of emotion throughout the movie.

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Can you tell us where this flick primarily takes place?

Philadelphia serves as the backdrop for the tense action in "The Irishman." Detailing WWII vet Frank Sheeran's life from the 1950s through the end of the 20th century, it focuses on how this blue-collar guy from Philly winds up working closely with mobsters throughout his lifetime.

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Tony Pro worked for this crime boss as part of the Genovese crime family. Can you name the don?

Fat Tony Salerno was a boss in the Genovese crime family, and pulled Tony Pro's strings. Some who contradict Frank Sheeran's account of Hoffa's death believe that it was Salerno who ordered Tony Pro to kill Hoffa.

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Hoffa heads to prison in '64. Who took over as head of the union when Hoffa was sent to the slammer?

With Hoffa behind bars, it was up to Frank Fitzsimmons to take control of the union. Of course, Hoffa was still pulling the strings from prison, though he and Fitzsimmons eventually had a falling out after Fitzsimmons' son was nearly killed by a car bomb.

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Hoffa's adopted son is along for the car ride as Hoffa is driven to his own murder. Can you name that son?

Hoffa's adopted son Chuckie O'Brien was in the car as his father was transported to his own murder scene. According to the accounts of the real Frank Sheeran, Chuckie probably had no clue what was about to go down.

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What does Frank tell Hoffa's wife Jo when he calls her after Hoffa "disappears?"

When the news of Hoffa's disappearance breaks, Frank Sheeran calls Hoffa's wife Jo to offer words of comfort. He never even hints at the truth, simply offering his condolences to Jo in one powerful bit of acting.

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Name the mobster, played by Harvey Keitel, who almost kills Frank after he gets involved in a plot with Whispers DiTullio.

Under orders from Whispers DiTullio, Frank plans to burn down Cadillac Linen Services. When Angelo Bruno, who has a financial interest in the business, finds out, he wants Frank killed. Fortunately, the Bufalinos step up and vouch for Frank, saving his life.

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He goes by the nickname Skinny Razor, but do you know what Felix DeTullio does for a living?

Felix DiTullio, who is called Skinny Razor in honor of his favorite weapon, owns a bar in Philly called the Friendly Lounge. In the film, he's played by Bobby Cannavale.

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Where did Hoffa lose his life?

In real life, Jimmy Hoffa was last seen in Detroit in 1975 and declared dead in 1982. In "The Irishman," he was gunned down by Frank Sheeran just outside the Motor City.

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What should a mobster pair with his bread when he's sentenced to decades in the slammer?

In early scenes, Russell Bufalino and Frank Sheeran meet at nice restaurants and dip chunks of bread into red wine. Once the pair finally end up behind bars, they are resigned to pairing their bread with grape juice in the prison cafeteria.

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Can you recall which fruit helped Hoffa and Sheeran bond when they first met?

One memorable scene in "The Irishman" shows Frank Sheeran meeting Jimmy Hoffa for the first time. The pair bond over a watermelon laced with vodka, resulting in a friendship that will endure for years ... and end in murder.

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Assuming "The Irishman" is totally true, what happened to Jimmy Hoffa's remains?

Frank Sheeran's part in Hoffa's death ended after he twice pulled the trigger, then laid the gun on Hoffa's body and walked away. The film shows a pair of other mobsters disposing of the corpse by cremating it, leaving no evidence for police to track down.

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Think you can name the Northeastern crime family that was led by a kingpin named Russell?

Frank Sheeran met mob boss Russell Bufalino through Russell's cousin Bill, a longtime lawyer for Jimmy Hoffa. Amazingly enough for the head of a major crime family, the real Russell Bufalino died in 1994 at the age of 90 ... of natural causes.

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Can you tell us which of these men was Frank's first hit?

One of Frank's first targets after becoming a hitman for the mob is Whispers DiTullio, played by Paul Herman. Whispers' attempt to get Frank to burn down a local business makes some mobsters murderously angry, so they send Frank to put an end to DiTullio.

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