There is a ton of stuff happening in the wildly entertaining Thor: Ragnarok trailer Marvel released this past weekend: Thor hanging out with the Hulk, Thor teaming up once again with his adopted brother Loki to take back Asgard from Hela, the Goddess of Death, Thor fighting the Hulk (in case you didn’t notice, the Hulk is featured a lot); in short, the film looks quite epic in scope. It may come as a surprise then to learn that the final cut  will probably have the shortest runtime of any Marvel Cinematic Universe film released to date.

Director Taika Waititi spoke with Collider following the premiere of the second Ragnarok trailer at San Diego Comic-Con this past weekend, revealing that the film’s run time is quite brisk in comparison to other MCU installments:

“The cut right now, I reckon it’s about 100 minutes. It’s not gonna be a very, very long film. I think that stories are better when you leave them wanting more, and this film moves at a clip, it’s got stuff happening all the time. I think people are still gonna feel exhausted by the end, they’ve been on this big journey and stuff, so I don’t think we need the film to be three hours.”

While things may very well change for the final cut — he also touched on there being a ton of deleted scenes — this news shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone familiar with Waititi’s previous work, as he’s a director known for favoring shorter runtimes (his most recent film, 2016’s Hunt for the Wilderpeople, clocked in at only 101 minutes). In an era where blockbuster films only seem to be getting longer, Waititi’s restraint is arguably something to be praised. It’s also not the first major 2017 film to clock in well under the two hour mark, with Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk coming in at 106 minutes (the shortest runtime of Nolan’s career), while Sony’s The Dark Tower is reportedly only 95 minutes long.

In other words, we probably shouldn’t worry about Thor: Ragnarok not feeling like Thor’s “biggest” adventure yet; it just might be his smallest in terms of overall length.

Source: Collider